BMALX142 – Storytelling, Myth and Ritual

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Module code
BMALX142
Module title
Storytelling, Myth and Ritual
Prescription
The purpose of this module is designed to introduce the student to an awareness of the importance of story and the mythic, expressed through both sacred and secular rituals. The module will examine the anthropological and historical functions of stories, myths and rituals, and examine the similarities of these structures of meanings to those of the present. The intention is to focus on the ways human beings attempt to articulate and comprehend their origins, death and the mystery of life.
Programmes
  • BM1801
  • BM1802
  • BM1901
  • BM1902
  • BM9601
NZQA Level
Level 5
NZQA Credits
15
Delivery method
  • Web-Enhanced
Learning hours
Directed hours
45
Self directed hours
105
Total learning hours
150
Resources required
Learning Outcomes
2.. LEARNING OUTCOMES AND PERFORMANCE CRITERIA
2.1 Recognise the role of myths and rituals in the present day
- establish definitions of myth
- focus on individual life experience (the rituals of transition)
- investigate ways in which this experience may be understood (with reference to the importance of the past)
- be able to discuss the idea of myth in a contemporary context

2.2 Recognise the role of myths and rituals in the past
- explore the functions of myth and ritual
- examine the relationship between myths and the functions of social groups
- survey major originating mythologies

2.3 Demonstrate ability to present coherent argument in written form
- identify the use of storytelling in the present day
- demonstrate an understanding of the different methods of storytelling currently in use
- be able to identify and discuss the ideas and concepts of storytelling
- develop an understanding of storytelling in a contemporary context

2.4 Recognise the purpose of storytelling in the past
- explore the historical functions of storytelling
- examine the relationship between storytelling and culture
- identify the use of language and metaphors in storytelling
- explore the history and social construction of storytelling

2.5 Comprehend the process of graded assessment
- employ a vocabulary for describing work
- consider and reflect upon working processes and decisions
- participate in ongoing formative assessment


3. CONTENT AND PROCESS

3.1 Making sense of life experience
Social meanings and tradition
Concepts of the self
Social roles and rituals of transition
Understanding experience through the frames of the past
Stories within us
Oral tradition and epics in the ancient world
Stories and the formation of culture
The narrative use of cultural values and beliefs in storytelling

3.2 Oral traditions, introduction to the idea of myth
The changing meanings and functions of mythology
The concept of myth in the present
Storytelling as cultural archetypes
Creating 'history' through the medium of storytelling
Storytelling as truth and subversion

3.3 Mythic thinking
Metaphor
Object
Tribal traditions in Aotearoa
Geographical and spiritual origins
The preserving of sacred knowledge
Myth and genealogy in tribal tradition

3.4 The anthropological view
Oral traditions as history
The recording and written preservation of oral traditions
The translation and publication of oral traditions
Hunter-gatherers
Planters
Shamans
Celestial worshippers

3.5 Modern storytellers, myths and rituals
Religion
Politics
Science
Business
Relationships
Sport
Media
Education
'Urban myths'
Image, costume and mask
Celebrity

3.6 Communicating with a range of cultures
Content of interest to a Mori audience
New Zealand cultural identities
Content from at least one other culture
Modes of address appropriate to the audience


Teaching and Learning Strategy
TEACHING/LEARNING METHODS

Tutorials, discussions, visiting speakers, videos, creativity through art practice, oral presentations, written assignments, library research, creation of book of course work

Lecturer prescribes exercises to develop skills in analysis of lectures.
Lecturer prescribes exercises to develop skills in analysis of texts.
Lecturer prescribes exercises to develop skills in oral presentation.
Lecturer prescribes exercises to develop skills in written presentation.
Lecturer identifies problems with students' working process and proposes strategies for addressing those problems.
Lecturer structures and monitors class discussions.
Students participate in formative assessment, lecturer provides questions.
Lecturer performs graded assessment.
Lecturer prescribes structure for working through stages of a project.
Students research content for their own projects.
Lecturer initiates and monitors student research.
Short Course Overview
GENERAL AIM AND RATIONAL
This module is designed to introduce students to an awareness of the importance of story and the mythic, expressed through both sacred and secular rituals. The course will examine the anthropological and historical functions of stories, myths and rituals, and examine the similarities of these structures of meanings to those of the present. The intention is to focus on the ways human beings attempt to articulate and comprehend their origins, death and the mystery of life. Social conventions, communications media and the arts will be explored in terms of mythic constructs and symbols. Students will also be encouraged to view the traditional and modern methods and uses of storytelling, and develop skills of performance in groups and as individuals