Dr Tracey Carlyon

March 2018

Academic Learning Advisor in Wintec’s Student Learning Services

 

Tracey has a background in teaching at all levels, and school leadership. Prior to coming to Wintec she held the position of Senior Lecturer at The University of Waikato. This role included research as well as teaching, supervision and lecturing in papers such as Professional Practice and Organisational Leadership.

Her research interests include change management, with both her Masters and Doctoral studies being focused on teachers’ transitions and the impact of these on both personal and professional identity, and learning. Both these studies aimed to learn more about support, such as coaching and mentoring, and the role that leaders play to ensure people are able to transition successfully. Tracey has been involved in additional research on the same topic, such as how to manage the transition from teaching in an international context back to New Zealand, and the different approaches that school leaders take to implementing change in their schools. All this research has shown that there can be personal and professional benefits when people transition successfully, however it has also brought to light that for this to occur it is essential that the complexity of the change process is understood and managed with care.

Tracey has also worked with the Ministry of Education on a large scale project to evaluate literacy and mathematics additional learning programmes for students in primary schools across New Zealand. Important implications from this research for school leaders and policy-makers included allowing teachers sufficient time for: establishing relationships with students and whanau; implementing culturally responsive pedagogy; and working collaboratively with others.

While much of her research methodology has been interpretive, Tracey also has expertise in using mixed methods for gathering and blending both qualitative and quantitative data to improve trustworthiness. She has published and presented both nationally and internationally.

     

Dr Tracey Carlyon